Playing From the Rough

The Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide Insurance - Final RoundWe all find ourselves in the rough from time to time, so it’s important to make the right decisions on club selection, grip and stance in order to minimize the damage for that hole and your overall score.

In the rough, you’re usually dealing with thick, long and sometimes damp grass.  This affects club head speed and the direction of the ball upon impact.  With this in mind, your best bet is usually a more lofted club, such as a wedge, that will allow you to punch the ball out of the rough, and lay it in a well positioned spot in the fairway.  A higher lofted club might rule out getting on the green, but it also diminishes the risk of not getting it airborne enough to get out of the rough all together.

Grip your club firmly and choke up an inch for stability.  This helps with control when the grass wraps itself around the club neck, causing the club to twist in your hand.

And remember – don’t get too greedy with this shot, something that’s especially tempting when you’re in a deeper lie.  The goal is to get yourself back into good position on the fairway, and onto the green in the next shot.

 

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Related Posts

Feet Together Drill

While keeping your feet together, practice hitting balls with the ball teed up with a 6, 7 or 8 iron. Go ahead and take your

Tai Chi Drill

  Imagine making a golf swing that lasts 30 seconds, or a minute and a half, or what about 10 minutes? The key for this

Push Drill

I like to use this putting drill for students who decelerate or slow down through impact on those shorter putts of 6 feet and in.

2021 SEASONAL SPECIAL at Chip Inks Golf

BUY 2 – One Hour Golf Lessons with Video Analysis for $250… Get 1 – One Hour Golf Lesson with Video Analysis Free!! To View a Sample Golf Lesson Analysis at

The Pump Drill

Practicing the pump drill can help you feel how the arms and shoulders should work during the transition from the backswing to the downswing. Start